DURGA PUJA & UNESCO HERITAGE

DURGA PUJA & UNESCO HERITAGE

DURGA PUJA & UNESCO HERITAGE

DURGA PUJA & UNESCO HERITAGE

Intangible Cultural Heritage:

Kolkata's Architectural Heritage:

Community Engagement and Social Cohesion:

Tourism and Global Recognition:

In 2021, UNESCO recognized Durga Puja as an intangible cultural heritage of humanity. This recognition acknowledges the cultural importance, craftsmanship, and community involvement associated with the festival.
Kolkata, capital of West Bengal, boasts rich architectural heritage and iconic landmarks tied to Durga Puja, like decorative pandals and cultural events. While UNESCO may recognize individual sites, Durga Puja enriches Kolkata’s culture.
Durga Puja facilitates community engagement, promoting social cohesion, cultural exchange, and artistic expression. It unites people from diverse backgrounds to celebrate, participate, and exhibit creativity through decorations and performances.
Durga Puja draws tourists globally to witness its grandeur. With international recognition, it’s highlighted in travel guides, documentaries, and cultural programs. UNESCO listing would amplify visibility, fostering cross-cultural understanding.

Listen with rapt attention

With this music, the puja of Bengal will begin

Message From: Murli Parsad
Message From: Murli Parsad

The story of Goddess Durga's creation and her battle with Mahishasura

The story of Goddess Durga's victory over Mahishasura:

The story of Goddess Durga's creation and her battle with Mahishasura is a significant mythological narrative in Hinduism, symbolizing the victory of good over evil. According to Hindu mythology, Mahishasura was a powerful demon who had obtained a boon from Lord Brahma, which made him nearly invincible. As a result, he became arrogant and tyrannical, wreaking havoc in the heavens and on earth.

The Emergence of Goddess Durga for Mahishasura's Defeat:

Unable to defeat Mahishasura, the gods sought the help of Lord Vishnu, Lord Shiva, and other divine beings. From their combined powers, a radiant and formidable goddess named Durga emerged. She was endowed with multiple arms, each carrying a divine weapon gifted by various gods, and rode into battle atop a lion, her mount.

The Epic Encounter of Goddess Durga and Mahishasura:

The battle between Durga and Mahishasura lasted for nine days and nights, during which Mahishasura transformed into various forms to evade Durga's attacks. On the tenth day, known as Vijaya Dashami or Dussehra, Durga finally vanquished Mahishasura, piercing him with her trident. The victory of Durga over Mahishasura symbolizes the triumph of good over evil, righteousness over injustice, and the restoration of cosmic order.

The Mythological Allegory of Durga's Battle with Mahishasura:

The story of Durga's battle with Mahishasura symbolizes the triumph of good over evil in Hindu mythology. Durga represents strength and compassion, while Mahishasura embodies ego and ignorance. Durga Puja, celebrated fervently in regions like West Bengal, Assam, and Tripura, honors this victory through rituals, worship, and cultural gatherings.

The story of Goddess Durga's creation and her battle with Mahishasura

The story of Goddess Durga's victory over Mahishasura:

The story of Goddess Durga's creation and her battle with Mahishasura is a significant mythological narrative in Hinduism, symbolizing the victory of good over evil. According to Hindu mythology, Mahishasura was a powerful demon who had obtained a boon from Lord Brahma, which made him nearly invincible. As a result, he became arrogant and tyrannical, wreaking havoc in the heavens and on earth.

The Emergence of Goddess Durga for Mahishasura's Defeat:

Unable to defeat Mahishasura, the gods sought the help of Lord Vishnu, Lord Shiva, and other divine beings. From their combined powers, a radiant and formidable goddess named Durga emerged. She was endowed with multiple arms, each carrying a divine weapon gifted by various gods, and rode into battle atop a lion, her mount.

The Epic Encounter of Goddess Durga and Mahishasura:

The battle between Durga and Mahishasura lasted for nine days and nights, during which Mahishasura transformed into various forms to evade Durga's attacks. On the tenth day, known as Vijaya Dashami or Dussehra, Durga finally vanquished Mahishasura, piercing him with her trident. The victory of Durga over Mahishasura symbolizes the triumph of good over evil, righteousness over injustice, and the restoration of cosmic order.

The Mythological Allegory of Durga's Battle with Mahishasura:

The story of Durga's battle with Mahishasura symbolizes the triumph of good over evil in Hindu mythology. Durga represents strength and compassion, while Mahishasura embodies ego and ignorance. Durga Puja, celebrated fervently in regions like West Bengal, Assam, and Tripura, honors this victory through rituals, worship, and cultural gatherings.

Avtar of Goddess Durga

Goddess Durga, also known as Devi or Shakti, is believed to have several manifestations or incarnations, each with its own unique attributes and significance. The most well-known and widely worshipped forms of Goddess Durga include:

Significance of Mahalaya

Invocation of Goddess Durga

Pitru Paksha Observance

Remembrance and Reflection

Cultural Traditions and Rituals

Mahalaya marks the beginning of Devi Paksha, the auspicious phase dedicated to the worship of Goddess Durga, which culminates with Durga Puja. It is believed that on Mahalaya, Goddess Durga begins her journey from her celestial abode to Earth, heralding the onset of festivity and celebration. The occasion serves as a solemn invocation to invite the divine presence of the Mother Goddess, invoking her blessings and protection for humanity.
Mahalaya also signifies the conclusion of Pitri Paksha, a fortnight-long period dedicated to honoring one’s ancestors and seeking their blessings and forgiveness. Hindus perform Tarpan, a ritual of offering water and prayers to their deceased ancestors during Pitri Paksha. Mahalaya marks the last day of this period, when offerings are made to appease the souls of departed ancestors, seeking their peace and blessings for the family’s well-being.
Mahalaya holds significance as a time for remembrance and reflection. It is an occasion for individuals to recall and honor their ancestors, acknowledging their contributions and seeking their continued guidance and blessings in life’s journey. Families often gather to perform rituals, offer prayers, and express gratitude to their forefathers, fostering a sense of familial bond and tradition.
Mahalaya is steeped in cultural traditions and rituals that have been passed down through generations. In Bengal, Mahalaya is associated with the famous radio program “Mahishasura Mardini,” which narrates the story of the defeat of the demon Mahishasura by Goddess Durga. People wake up early in the morning to listen to these recitations, which are believed to invoke the presence of the Goddess and dispel negativity. Additionally, Mahalaya heralds the beginning of elaborate preparations for Durga Puja, including the crafting of idols, decorating pandals, and organizing cultural events and festivities that bring communities together.

Significance of Mahalaya

Invocation of Goddess Durga

Pitru Paksha Observance

Remembrance and Reflection

Cultural Traditions and Rituals

Mahalaya marks the beginning of Devi Paksha, the auspicious phase dedicated to the worship of Goddess Durga, which culminates with Durga Puja. It is believed that on Mahalaya, Goddess Durga begins her journey from her celestial abode to Earth, heralding the onset of festivity and celebration. The occasion serves as a solemn invocation to invite the divine presence of the Mother Goddess, invoking her blessings and protection for humanity.
Mahalaya also signifies the conclusion of Pitri Paksha, a fortnight-long period dedicated to honoring one’s ancestors and seeking their blessings and forgiveness. Hindus perform Tarpan, a ritual of offering water and prayers to their deceased ancestors during Pitri Paksha. Mahalaya marks the last day of this period, when offerings are made to appease the souls of departed ancestors, seeking their peace and blessings for the family’s well-being.
Mahalaya holds significance as a time for remembrance and reflection. It is an occasion for individuals to recall and honor their ancestors, acknowledging their contributions and seeking their continued guidance and blessings in life’s journey. Families often gather to perform rituals, offer prayers, and express gratitude to their forefathers, fostering a sense of familial bond and tradition.
Mahalaya is steeped in cultural traditions and rituals that have been passed down through generations. In Bengal, Mahalaya is associated with the famous radio program “Mahishasura Mardini,” which narrates the story of the defeat of the demon Mahishasura by Goddess Durga. People wake up early in the morning to listen to these recitations, which are believed to invoke the presence of the Goddess and dispel negativity. Additionally, Mahalaya heralds the beginning of elaborate preparations for Durga Puja, including the crafting of idols, decorating pandals, and organizing cultural events and festivities that bring communities together.

Upcoming Festivals

The upcoming festival in Kolkata, Durga Puja, heralds a mesmerizing spectacle of grand pandals, rhythmic dhakis (drummers), and delectable bhog (prasad), embracing the city in a jubilant embrace of Bengali culture and tradition. Join us as we immerse ourselves in the vibrant spirit of this iconic celebration, honoring the triumph of good over evil with devotion and joy.

Our Testimonials

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Embracing Tradition: The Timeless Devotion of Durga Puja in Varanasi
In the ancient city of Varanasi, amidst flickering oil lamps and echoing chants, a humble community fervently prepared for Durga Puja, invoking ancient rites to honor the goddess. As dawn broke, the sacred river witnessed devotees offering flowers and prayers, weaving together centuries-old traditions with timeless devotion.
Divine Triumph: The Eternal Symbolism of Maa Durga in Myth and Devotion
Maa Durga, the divine mother, emerged from the cosmic energies, wielding weapons gifted by the gods, to vanquish the evil demon Mahishasura and restore balance to the universe, symbolizing triumph of good over evil, courage over fear, and righteousness over tyranny. Her valor and compassion inspire devotees to seek strength and protection, fostering devotion and love across the realms.
Eternal Triumph: Maa Durga's Valor in the Defeat of Mahishasura
In the ancient saga, Maa Durga, as Mahisasurmardini, wielded her divine strength to vanquish the formidable demon Mahishasura, restoring balance to the celestial realms. With her valorous battles echoing through eternity, she emerged as the epitome of feminine power and triumph over evil.
Celebrating Divine Grace: The Timeless Tradition of Durga Puja in an Indian Village
In ancient times, a small village nestled in the heart of the Indian subcontinent fervently celebrated Durga Puja, a sacred ritual to honor the goddess and seek her blessings for a bountiful harvest. The villagers adorned handmade idols with flowers and performed traditional dances, fostering a timeless connection between the divine and the earthly, creating a cultural legacy that echoed through the ages.

Lakshmi

Goddess Lakshmi, the consort of Lord Vishnu, is another form of Durga. She symbolizes wealth, prosperity, and abundance.

Radha

Radha, the beloved consort of Lord Krishna in Hindu mythology, is sometimes considered an incarnation of Goddess Durga. She represents divine love and devotion.

Parvati

Parvati is the gentle and nurturing form of Durga, representing love, fertility, and marital bliss. She is the consort of Lord Shiva and is often depicted as a devoted wife and mother.

Saraswati

Saraswati is the goddess of knowledge, music, arts, and wisdom. She is depicted with a veena (musical instrument) and a book, representing learning and creativity.

Sita

Sita, the consort of Lord Rama in the Hindu epic Ramayana, is also considered an incarnation of Goddess Durga. She embodies virtues like purity, devotion, and unwavering loyalty.

Kali

Kali is the fierce and wrathful form of Durga, symbolizing destruction of evil forces and the power of time. She is often depicted with a dark complexion, wearing a garland of skulls, and wielding weapons.